Loyd Matthews returning home

UNION – Loyd Matthews, son of Alva and Mildred Matthews of Union, was born Aug. 20, 1930. He was a member of Bluff Springs Church of God, where he was active in youth groups during his teenage years. He graduated from Union High School, where he was very active in the Future Farmers of America organization and got the first registered cow for the Matthews dairy farm. He grew up in a large family. He enjoyed working on the farm and loved animals. He also loved his family, community, and his nation. Loyd went on to graduate from East Central Community College, where he was active in the Future Farmers of America and a member of the International Relations Club, first vice president. He also starred as Robert Browning in the production “The Barretts on Wimpole St.” He was a member of the Tom-Tom Staff, Radio Club and took voice lessons and was very interested in public speaking.

He went on to Anderson University, Anderson, Ind. After the first year, he made the decision to drop out of the university and join the United States Air Force. The Korean War was going on at that time. He completed basic training at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas and was assigned to duty at Brooks Air Force Base, then he was sent to Stillwater, Okla., for special training session there. Shortly thereafter, he received orders to report to Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska. He, along with 51 other military personnel departed McCord Air Force Base aboard a C-124 Globemaster enroute to Elmendorf in Anchorage, Alaska. On Nov. 22, 1952, the plane hit Mt. Gannett, Alask

to read more: http://www.meridianstar.com/obituaries/loyd-matthews/article_018c43f4-b5bb-11e5-a3e7-fb8862635e5f.html

Warrior Care—even 63 years after death Col. Noel Elmer Hoblit has returned home

Air Force Lieutenant Colonel (ret.) Fred Hoblit (left) and Air Force Col. (ret.) Jerry Hoblit (right) sit graveside during services for their father, Air Force Col. Noel Elmer Hoblit, on May 21, 2015 at Arlington National Cemetery.

Air Force Lieutenant Colonel (ret.) Fred Hoblit (left) and Air Force Col. (ret.) Jerry Hoblit (right) sit graveside during services for their father, Air Force Col. Noel Elmer Hoblit, on May 21, 2015 at Arlington National Cemetery. The elder Hoblit perished in an airplane crash in Alaska on Nov. 22, 1952. Personnel assigned to the Joint Recovery Prisoner of War Missing In Action team, located, identified and returned Hoblit’s remains to his family for a ceremony with honor. (Photo courtesy of the Hoblit family.)

 

 

Nov. 22, 1952, is a day that lives forever in the minds of the Hoblit family. It’s the day when their patriarch, Air Force Col. Noel Hoblit, a military dentist, lost his life when the military cargo aircraft he was on slammed into a snow-covered glacier on a mountain in Alaska. He was returning to Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska, after an official trip to the Pentagon.

“It was the pivotal moment in my life,” said retired Air Force Lt. Col. Fred Hoblit, who was just 6 years old when his father died that fateful day. “Everything that I have done or has happened to me professionally is a result of that event.”

Now, with help from the Defense Health Agency’s Armed Force Medical Examiners System (AFMES), Noel Hoblit’s remains have been identified and returned home. Last May, his DNA-identified remains were laid to rest with full honors next to his wife, Virginia Hoblit, at Arlington National Cemetery. “This gives our entire family a sense of closure,” said Hoblit.

“The Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command and Joint Task Force have been recovering the remains and identifying what they can,” said Army Col. Ladd Tremaine, director of the system at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. “This past summer, remains from the previous years’ recovery efforts were turned over to our labs for identification. So far, 20 victims of the crash have been identified of the 52 who were aboard.”

To read more: http://health.mil/News/Articles/2015/11/05/Warrior-Care-even-63-years-after-death

Airman 2nd Class Bateman Burns courtesy of Nathan Burns

Batemans Burns

WASHINGTON (AFNS) — The Air Force announced Nov. 3 the name of a service member whose remains were recovered from a C-124 Globemaster that was lost on Nov. 22, 1952.

Airman 2nd Class Bateman R. Burns has been recovered and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors. On Nov. 22, 1952, a C-124 Globemaster crashed while en route to Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska, from McChord Air Force Base, Washington. There were 11 crewmen and 41 passengers on board. Adverse weather conditions precluded immediate recovery attempts.  In late November and early December 1952, search parties were unable to locate and recover any of the service members.

On June 9, 2012, an Alaska National Guard (AKNG) UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter crew spotted aircraft wreckage and debris while conducting a training mission over the Colony Glacier, immediately west of Mount Gannett. Three days later another AKNG team landed at the site to photograph the area and they found artifacts at the site that related to the wreckage of the C-124 Globemaster.  Later that month, the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) and Joint Task Force team conducted a recovery operation at the site and recommended it continued to be monitored for possible future recovery operations.

In 2013, additional artifacts were visible and every summer since then, during a small window of opportunity, Alaskan Command and AKNG personnel have been supporting the joint effort of Operation Colony Glacier. Medical examiners from the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System used testing done by the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory along with other forensic evidence in the identification of the service members. DNA testing continues to identify the remaining personnel. The crash site continues to be monitored for future possible recovery.

For more information, please contact the Air Force public affairs at 703-695-0640. For service record specific information, please contact the National Archives at 314-801-0816.

http://www.arpc.afrc.af.mil/News/ArticleDisplay/tabid/267/Article/627530/af-announces-operation-colony-glacier-casualty-recovery.aspx#

Col. Noel Hoblit comes home

On November 22nd, 1952, a C-124 Globemaster aircraft crashed while en route to Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska, from McChord Air Force Base, Washington. There were 52 souls on board. 11 crewmen and 41. Adverse weather conditions made immediate recovery attempts impossible. When search parties were finally able to make it to the site in late November and early December 1952, they were unable to locate and recover any of the service members.

Nearly 60 years later, on June 9, 2012, an Alaska National Guard (AKNG) UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter crew spotted aircraft wreckage and debris while conducting a training mission over the Colony Glacier, immediately west of Mount Gannett. Three days later another AKNG team landed at the site to photograph the area and they found artifacts at the site that related to the wreckage of the C-124 Globemaster.

Col. Noel Hoblit was on that flight. This is his home coming ceremony.

Capt John E. Ponikvar, Jr

provided by Marybeth Novak Lindgren

 

 

 

Birth: Jul. 15, 1922
Chisholm
St. Louis County
Minnesota, USA
Death: Nov. 22, 1952
Matanuska-Susitna Borough
Alaska, USA

World War II & Korea
US Air Force
Captain
10 Air ForceSon of John and Frances (Globokar) Ponikvar. Married to ___________________. Sisters Veda, Jennie, Frances and Mary.On November 22, 1952, the C-124 Globemaster known as “Old Shaky’s”, with 52 military personnel aboard was returning to Elmendorf Air Force Base in Anchorage, Alaska from McCord Air Force Base, Washington. They were last heard from in a garbled transmission intercepted by a Northwest Orient Airlines crew just after clearing the coast near Whittier, Alaska. The C-124 crashed into the 8,000 foot level of Surprise Glacier on Mount Garrett in bad weather. The crash site was located within a couple of days however, before the rescue/recovery team could reach the site another storm came through dumping over 8 inches of snow on the wreckage. No sign of life had been acknowledged. The wreckage was not seen again until June 2012, nearly 60 years later, 12 miles from the original site and on Colony Glacier near Palmer, Alaska. An expedited recovery was arranged as the glacier is melting and moving at an alarming rate and every year the remains get closer to being lost in the rivers heading toward the ocean. Human remains are being sent to Hawaii for identification. Artifacts are being collected and documented. 
Burial:
Calvary Cemetery
Chisholm
St. Louis County
Minnesota, USA
Plot: Section B, Veterans’ Plots

 

 

Provided from: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Ponikvar&GSfn=John&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=141386556&df=all&

Col Noel Hoblit

The son of a mason and boarding house entrepreneur joined the military(Reserves prior) in 1952 earned his Master in Dentistry and was appointed the Chief Dental Surgeon at McChord AFB. Col Noel Hoblit has made his final journey home after 62 years and I was there to see that journey.

When I received the email from Hoblit’s grand-daughter Heidi asking if I would attend the services, all I could do was smile. Another one of our men has come home to his family after all these years. While I was checking into my hotel room I noticed a face I had only seen in family pictures sitting in the lobby. I got to the counter and Col Jerry Hoblit tapped me on the shoulder. He introduced himself, he said Thank you (a lot more words were said) and we hugged. What he didn’t know was when I got to my room I teared up. Those words I will take/hold with me forever.

The morning of the services it was cold (for me), wet and dark. I made my way to the services and what I seen was a family that has longed for the return of the patriarch. The doors opened, everyone stood, and Col Noel Hoblit made his way into the church. I turned and the look on Col Jerry and Fred Hoblit were like to young boys awaiting their father coming home after a long day a work; priceless.

After the services everyone went to the gathering and this is where I got my chance to meet Mr. Fred Hoblit. He was only 5 years old when his father died. What I found so moving was he stated that one of his good memories was of his father teaching him to comb his hair. I walked up to him and introduced myself. He had a big smile, we talked and he reached into his pocket to show me something. Out came a little clear bag and inside was Col. Noel Dog Tags from the plane crash. I had seen a lot of things from the crash, but this one was a little more personal. I asked if I could take a picture of it, if he didn’t mind. He stated “YES, it is because of you I have it.” I turned and said “No mother nature and the Blackhawk team played a big part too.” We smiled and laughed. He & I talked a little more and I asked if I could have a picture with him. He said with little old me and we just laughed out loud…memories.

I am getting ready to leave, I take time to walk up to Col Jerry to say bye, we talked a little more, and he introduced me to several other family members. I got a chance to hear some family stories and we all took pictures
.
I want to personally thank the Hoblit Family for welcoming me with open arms and making me feel like one of the family too. To Arlington, once again “Thank you” for all you have done to return Col Hoblit to his TRUE final resting place.

“Another day less that I’ll have to wait until I can take you in my arms and tell you again and again that I LOVE YOU.” ~Col Noel Hoblit

Part of a love letter he wrote to his wife Ginia.

Col Noel Hoblit, I am glad I was there to see that one less day. He was laid to rest on the same day of his wedding anniversary to Ginia.

~Tonja Anderson-Del

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